The Power of Awareness Reveals Super Heroes

Super Heroes have Super Powers

Super Heroes have Super Powers

I have been questioning my Power of Awareness to reveal Super Heroes!

Who first thought up the concept of a “Super Hero”?

When did Super Heroes first enter your field of Awareness?

Why were Super Heroes gifted with Super Powers?

 

I was listening to a lengthy conversation yesterday, between my niece and grandson. They were discussing their favourite Super Heroes and their Super Powers. Since then, I have been reflecting on whom I identify as Super Heroes, and why.

Myths and Legends have been passed down through the ages to record events and information. Sometimes, these were through song, dance and recitals. Others were through storytelling, rituals and written word.

Storytelling connects us to our ancestors, down through the ages. I have been telling my grandson many stories, especially about his first months of life – where I was present and could share my memories of events that he was too little to consciously recall at this present time. I love telling him stories about when his own mother – my daughter – was a child. These are the stories that connect him to the child in his adult mother. The stories that fascinate a child, who can’t quite believe that his Super Hero mom was also a Super Hero child.

Which brings me to ask again – what or whom is a Super Hero?

When we engage the full Power of our Awareness, Super Heroes are revealed, all around us, in our midst.

Super Heroes are not mythical figures who set out to save the world, to destroy evil or to vanquish monsters. They are people just like you and me. People who aspire to give their best, to shine their light into the darkest corners, and to allow their love to radiate without concern for results. Everyday people doing everyday activities, but with the awareness that every conscious act of love has the power to vanquish fear and despair.

Super Powers include compassion, paying attention, active listening, just being present, doing what is yours to do, bringing what is yours to bring, being the highest version of yourself, living in gratitude.

Which other Super Powers do you recognise in the Super Heroes amongst us?

Would you join me as we exercise our Power of Awareness and declare every day a Super Heroes Day?

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How Many Acupuncture Sessions?

How many acupuncture sessions are enough

HeartFire Acupuncture Clinic

I am frequently asked how many acupuncture sessions I would recommend for various treatment conditions.

During my early acupuncture training that we were taught that acupuncture has a cumulative effect. This means that the more acupuncture sessions you have, the longer the treatment effects last. How many acupuncture sessions are enough?

If a person’s system is depleted of energy they may already be experiencing symptoms. Their energy stores would need to be balanced and then enhanced, before you could bring about a resolution of the symptoms affecting them.

In my experience over the years I have practiced acupuncture, I have seen some people who have responded immediately to a single session of acupuncture. Others with seemingly the same set of symptoms may take much longer to respond.

Once again, this reinforces my belief that ‘one size does not fit all’. We are each unique. We respond in our own way to our individual needs in our own individual set of circumstances.

While I remember these ‘rules’ clearly, I felt it would be both helpful and interesting to research some Journal articles on a few conditions that I work with. I wanted to know how many acupuncture sessions were completed during their research, and the frequency of the sessions. I have summarised a few articles below.

The first article [1] deals with Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy. This is the most common late complication of diabetes. These patients may experience loss of sensation and strength, prickling or pain.

A randomized controlled trial was performed where 42 patients participated in one  acupuncture session per day lasting 30 minutes, for 15 days. (Total of 15 sessions). The results of the trial suggest that acupuncture can delay the progressive deterioration of nerve function secondary to Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy, and could actually accelerate the nerve regenerative process. The treatment also appeared to significantly improve subjective symptom scores, particular numbness, pain, rigidity and alterations in temperature perception.

An Abstract from another article describes a long-term study of Acupuncture for the treatment of chronic peripheral diabetic neuropathy [2]. 46 patients were treated with acupuncture analgesia. The patients received up to 6 courses of classical acupuncture analgesia over a period of 10 weeks.

77% of the patients showed a significant improvement in their primary and / or secondary symptoms. These patients were followed up for a period of 18-52 weeks. Only 24% of the patients required further acupuncture sessions. 21% of the patients noted that their symptoms cleared completely.

The conclusion suggests that acupuncture is a safe and effective therapy for the long-term management of painful diabetic neuropathy.

Acupuncture in a Rheumatology Clinic [3] is the topic of the third article. An acupuncture clinic was established for a limited period within a rheumatology department of a hospital.

41 patients underwentprospective observational study in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment. Courses of 6-8 acupuncture sessions of traditional and trigger-point acupuncture were offered for a specified range of conditions. (Neck pain, Thoracic pain, Low back and leg pain, Knee pain, Ankle and foot pain, Shoulder pain).

Contrary to expectation, some patients with a long history of degenerative disease responded well.

In conclusion, 73% of rheumatology patients included in the study showed at least a 33% improvement in pain after acupuncture treatment. There was a considerable reduction in the intake of analgesic drugs.

A Pilot clinical study of 31 Frozen Shoulders [4] describes the symptoms as ‘severe aching in the shoulder and upper arm, with tenderness around the area. All glenohumeral movements become restricted to about 25% of normal expected movement’.

These patients commonly get little relief from conventional medical treatment or physiotherapy.

Of all the 31 patients treated, all but one (who withdrew after only 2 treatments) had beneficial responses. Some patients obtained therapeutic effect with only 4 acupuncture sessions. Others needed up to 15 acupuncture sessions for the same level of benefit.

“It appears to be individual response rather than a specific optimum number of treatment sessions that determines both the amount of benefit and the speed of recovery in acupuncture treatment”.

How many sessions of acupuncture would you, personally, benefit from? Let’s offer your body the chance to discover your optimal treatment response!

 

References:

  1. Fifteen-day Acupuncture Treatment Relieves Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Yanqing Tong, Hongyang Guo, Bing Han; J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2010; 3(2):95-103
  2. Acupuncture for the treatment of painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy: a long-term study; B. Abuaisha, J. B. Costanzi, A. J. M. Boulton; http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S016882279700123X
  3. Acupuncture in a Rheumatology Clinic: Rosemary Alexander, Adrian White; Acupuncture in medicine Dec 2000 Vol 18 (2) p100-103
  4. Frozen Shoulder: A Comparison of Western and Traditional Chinese Approaches and a Clinical Study of its Acupuncture Treatment; Emad S Tukmachi. Acupuncture in Medicine June 1999 Vol 17 (1) p9-21
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Time to Grieve

Is taking time to grieve selfish? Is it a form of self-pity?

taking time to grieve

Taking time to grieve

I recently visited an elderly woman in her home, in my community therapy role. So much had been happening in her world. During the weeks since my last visit she had experienced some serious health challenges, and her brother had died.

How could I be surprised that she had not managed to continue with the exercise and walking program we had started?

She was tired, heartbroken and wracked with guilt. She described herself as “full of self-pity” because she was mourning the loss of her dear brother. This had also reminded her of the grief she experienced when her sister died a year previously.

I sat and listened with my Whole Heart.

I was not there to offer solutions, to slap a band-aid over her aching heart, to make light of her feelings. I told her I believed it was good, right and proper to feel such acute loss and to express it. How else do we recover from our deep wounds?

She told me about her family, her ancestors who had migrated to New Zealand from an Eastern European country, just before the time of the Depression. She spoke of a grandfather who worked many menial jobs to provide for his family of seven children. Her parents also worked hard to raise her and her many siblings – a labour of love which she reflected on with great gratitude. She spoke of one of her sisters who had endured many trials and tribulations only to finally triumph – and she now lives overseas. She spoke with love of her own children – their successes and challenges.

In the telling, she called all of her Ancestors into that small lounge. I could feel them standing around her. I told her that I believed that talking about our Loved ones brings them close.

I can recognise the entrenched belief that being occupied fully, being accountable for every minute spent at the expense of any form of pure relaxation, has been ingrained in our psyches. No wonder, then, that this dear soul believed she was “full of self-pity” because her thoughts kept turning to those she loved dearly who were no longer here, in physical form. Because she could not do it for herself, I offered her the gift of my time, so that she could express what her heart was longing to share.

When it was time for me to leave, she hugged me tightly and thanked me for “just listening”. I feel I was the recipient of the greater gift. I heard her heart sing!

Do you feel taking time to grieve is selfish? Do you believe it is a form of self-pity?

I welcome your comments.

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Productive and Efficient Daily Success Plan

Productive and Efficient Daily Success Plan brings Freedom

Productive and Efficient Daily Success Plan brings Freedom

If I utilised a Daily Success Plan for my Freedom Plan Business, my perfect day would be productive and efficient.  Today’s Blog Challenge invites me to describe what I would do, when I would do it and how I would feel once I had completed my daily plan.

Natalie Sisson’s 3 guidelines are a great starting point.

  • Our work space needs to be clear and uncluttered. Ideally, in our own home office area, with no distractions from well-meaning friends or family members who may not realise we are actually working!
  • Then, we need to set the 3 most important actions for the day.
  • We work most efficiently when we have a deadline, so the Pomodoro Method (working in 25 minute intervals) is a very effective method to keep on track and working to the assigned task – no distractions!

My home study is peaceful, and I aim to keep the tiny desk free of clutter. To do so, and to remain productive and efficient, I need to keep papers to a minimum.  One of my daily success plan tasks is to pay bills as they come in, and file the paperwork immediately.  I do admit to having piles of ‘things to do’ that I am working on…. Writing and filing notes from meetings I attend, keeping my Professional Development folder current etc.

I receive a fair amount of correspondence via email, concerning initiatives I am involved in. I don’t always answer each on the day I receive them as some require contemplation before response.

I am pondering how to advance my business, and have been consulting with coaches and participating in online courses / workshops – like this blogging challenge!

I can easily list 3 of my top current important actions for my daily success plan:

  1. Work on revising my website and eBook
  2. Write my blog
  3. Pay any due invoices, correspondence, filing

I would focus on the first one early in the morning, before my ‘other work’, and then complete the rest in the evening ‘after hours’. To hold myself accountable, I could tick off the activities in my diary, or I could go so far as to draw up a planner to keep track of the activities.

I already feel energised and enthusiastic, having used the Pomodoro timing segmsnts

to write this blog. This has been a most productive and efficient use of my Saturday morning,

How do you hold yourself accountable – I would love you to share!

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