New Thinking – New Experience

New Thinking brings New Experience for www.selfmanagechronicpain.com

New Thinking brings New Experience

 

Have you recently changed your thinking about something, and noticed how your world opened up? New Thinking results in New Experience.

Last weekend I was one of the many people promoting a service and health based product at our local Mind Body Spirit Festival, which is held every six months at a multi-storied venue in the city. Stalls or cubicles are set up on the first two floors, with talks and workshops taking place on the third floor.

Regulars to the Festival feel a sense of familiarity with the layout and recognise many of the stall holders as they return each time, often to their same ‘space’. For a newcomer, the experience can be totally overwhelming! Imagine how much new thinking is stimulated, which results in new experience.

First, there is the sense of excitement, the hub-bub of sounds – conversation, music, general activity. The visual stimulation is intense. Posters, wall hangings, tables laden with enticing objects, the vibrant clothing and jewellery people are wearing. Your sense of smell is awakened, by the aroma of foods in the food area, fragrances of massage oils, soaps and other products.

So much to see, so many services and products on offer, so many people searching for who knows what? If you came with a particular purpose in mind, it is easy to fulfill your mission and leave feeling satisfied. But what if you had no idea what you were ultimately looking for? A vague sense of wanting something, hoping you would know what it was once it was in front of you.

I met people for whom all of these situations were true.

On the first day I was stationed at our stall, waiting for people to pass by, hoping to interest them in what we had to offer. Many times, these people had a dazed look about them, not wanting to be ‘accosted again’ by a zealous stall holder determined to bend their ear about the “next best thing”. They looked harried, overstimulated, tired, in need of a reassuring hug and a still quiet place to recover their equilibrium. Perhaps new thinking was too active resulting in too many new experiences.

I did not particularly enjoy the hours ‘attached’ to the stall. I did not feel that I created enough opportunities to serve, to offer anything of value to these people who were obviously searching for ‘something’, yet trying to escape from feeling cornered.

Overnight, I realised that my experience would change when my attitude and actions changed. I welcomed new thinking and new experiences. I decided to ‘be the change’, and spent the morning as a Roving Ambassador of Goodwill. I set out to meet each stall holder, to find out who they were, where they came from, what they were offering, and how I could meet any of their needs with what I was offering.

Guess what? I met so many interesting and lovely people! I handed out small samples as an energy exchange. I practiced the art of receiving too, accepting compliments and any snippets of advice or information. The experience was priceless.

Someone suggested to me that I could host my own stall next time – as a Roving Ambassador of Goodwill. It is a thought! Meanwhile, I shall keep practicing the technique: New Thinking leads to New Experiences.

If you enjoyed reading this post, and if you have had similar experiences, please share and re-post, especially if re-posting is a new experience for you!

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Balneotherapy helps Fibromyalgia?

Head to your nearest thermal mineral water spa !

 

selfmanagechronicpain with balneotherapy

Enjoying the Therapeutic effects of Balneotherapy and Hydrotherapy

Therapeutic Effect of Balneotherapy and Hydrotherapy in the Management of Fibromyalgia Syndrome

Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a debilitating condition of almost unknown etiology and pathogenesis that is characterised by widespread musculoskeletal pain and tenderness, as well as secondary symptoms like fatigue, depression, irritable bowel syndrome and sleep disturbances.

A standard therapy regimen is lacking. Patient-tailored approaches are emphasised recommending non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions according to individual symptoms. Self-management strategies involving active patient participation should be an integral component of the therapeutic plan.

Balneotherapy (thermal mineral water spas) and Hydrotherapy are commonly used interventions.

A qualitative systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials showed that:

For Hydrotherapy with exercise, at the end of treatment, there was:

  • Moderate-to-strong evidence for a small reduction in pain
  • Moderate-to-strong evidence for a small improvement in health related quality of life (HRQOL)
  • No effect seen for depressive symptoms and Tender Point Count (TPC).
  • Follow-up data provided moderate evidence for maintenance of improvement with regard to pain.
  • No group difference was found when comparing water-based exercise to land-based exercise.

For Balneotharapy in mineral / thermal water, at end of treatment, there was:

  • Moderate evidence for medium-to-large size reduction in pain and TPC
  • Moderate evidence given for a medium improvement of HRQOL
  • No significant effect was found for depressive symptoms.
  • Moderate evidence for maintenance of improvements was found at follow-up, with smaller effects.

Pain may be relieved by the hydrostatic pressure of the water and the effects of the temperature on the nerve endings, as well as by muscle relaxation. It has been shown that thermal mud baths increase plasma levels of beta-endorphin, which explains their analgesic and anti-spastic effect.

The beneficial effects of water treatments are probably the result of a combination of specific (for example, buoyancy, aquatic resistance, heat) and unspecific effects (for example, change of environment, spa-scenery).

Source:

Therapeutic Benefit of Balneotherapy and Hydrotherapy in the Management of Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Johannes Naumann, Catharina Sadaghiani

Arthritis Res Ther. 2014; 16(R141) © 2014 BioMed Central, Ltd. http://medscape.com

 

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A New Name for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

 

Managing Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID)

A New Name for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

An article in Medscape caught my eye last week. If you suffer from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, you may find it interesting too.

 

problems with movement?

do you experience fatigue, perhaps sleep difficulties, and brain fog?

Dr Paul Auwaerter is based at the Johns Hopkins Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. He reports that some of his most challenging outpatient visits are with patients who describe long-standing problems that include fatigue, perhaps sleep difficulties, and brain fog.

 Often they may not be functioning well, perhaps experiencing problems in school or at work. Most of these patients are quite bright; they are analytical and sophisticated. They are hoping that something can be found to explain their fatigue and symptoms.

He explains that patients want to embrace something that makes sense. In fact, science has determined that the human brain likes distinct answers, and that uncertainty seems to amplify problems.

The term “chronic fatigue syndrome” or “myalgic encephalomyelitis” was developed and the defining criteria included:

  • more than 6 months of symptoms
  • an inability to perform customary activities.

The term resulted in a fair amount of controversy and sometimes even stigma because many clinicians believe this could be a psychosomatic illness; while others believe it is quite real. There is also symptom overlap with other syndromic problems, including fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome.

“Within this context, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) was charged by several federal agencies to come up with a new name, some subcategories, and other aspects. In sum, the IOM committee decided that it would be important to rename chronic fatigue syndrome something that captures the nature of this. They have called it “systemic exertion intolerance disease,” or SEID.”

The criteria for SEID include:

  • substantial decline in functional activities for at least 6 months
  • post-exertional fatigue
  • non-restorative sleep.

And then at least one of the following:

  • cognitive impairment or orthostatic intolerance
  • gastrointestinal issues
  • pain
  • stimuli hypersensitivity
  • lymphadenopathy
  • sore throat

Some patients may develop SEID / chronic fatigue syndrome after having an authentic infection from which they never seem to recuperate and for others, there seems to be no precipitating factor. The condition afflicts a large number of people, children and young adults included, and the best treatment strategies -compiled by Simon Wessely and colleagues, (who did a fair amount of work on chronic fatigue syndrome and Gulf War syndrome), and others include:

  • graded exercises
  • conditioning to build up tolerance
  • cognitive-behavioral therapy.

Once again, a graduated approach to increasing physical activity is one of the most beneficial interventions.

What are your thoughts about these recommendations?

 

Reference:

Dr Paul Auwaerter

Medscape Infectious Diseases © 2015  WebMD, LLC

Cite this article: Managing Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID). Medscape. Mar 03, 2015.

 

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What Is The Most Effective Weapon For Fibromyalgia?

Aerobic Exercise !

aerobic exercise is the most effective ‘weapon’ that we have

People with fibromyalgia benefit from continuous physical exercise.

 

A recent article in www.medscape.com by Alice Goodman summarised an overview of research on fibromyalgia treatment that was presented at the Paris 2014 European League Against Rheumatism Congress.

Winfried Häuser MD, from Technische Universität Munchen is an expert in the field of fibromyalgia. He believes that treatment for people with fibromyalgia should be individualised and include non pharmacalogical approaches, as these are often more effective than drugs. He explained that aerobic exercise is the most effective ‘weapon’ that we have and both healthy people and people with fibromyalgia benefit from continuous physical exercise.

He and his colleagues recently published a network meta-analysis which was an indirect comparison of all available therapies for fibromyalgia. They were unable to find any significant differences in effectiveness between drug and non-drug therapies. While the effects of drugs are lost once the patient stops taking them, the effects of aerobic exercise and multicomponent therapy are sustained but declining at 1 or 2 years.

Dr Häuser advocates a graduated approach to treating fibromyalgia.

Mild fibromyalgia: can be managed with reassurance from the doctor and encouragement to engage in regular physical and mental activities.

Moderate fibromyalgia: should be managed with aerobic exercise and the temporary limited use of drugs.

Severe fibromyalgia: can be managed with aerobic exercise, drugs and the psychological and/or psychopharmalogic treatment of mental comorbidities.

Dr Mary-Ann Fitzcharles, a rheumatologist at McGill University in Montreal who treats people with fibromyalgia, agreed with the patient-tailored approach outlined by Dr Häuser. She cautioned about overmedicating people, and keeping them on continued medications which have side effects. Non Pharmalocological therapies have no risks, she explained.

Dr Fitzcharles went on to say that non pharmacologic therapies are probably the most important ones for people with fibromyalgia. In her experience, every person with fibromyalgia should be managed with exercise, promotion of an internal locus of control and education.

Activity pacing is the key, in order to not overdo or avoid exercise.

Non Pharmacological therapies include:

  • Aerobic exercise
  • Acupuncture
  • Psychotherapy

Pharmacologic / drug therapies include:

  • GABA analogues
  • Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs)
  • Tricyclic antidepressants
  • Serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)

References:

  1. Aerobic Exercise ‘Most effective weapon’ for Fibromyalgia. Medscape. June19, 2014. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseasesard.bmj.com
  1. Comparative efficacy of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions in fibromyalgia syndrome: network meta-analysis

          Eveline Nüesch, Winfried Häuser, Kathrin Bernardy, Jürgen Barth, Peter Jüni

               Ann Rheum Dis 2013;72:955-962 doi:10.1136/annrheumdis-2011-201249

 

 

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Positioned for Success – Poor Posture Influences Movement and Chronic Pain

functional posture

Our posture helps to position us for success and prevent chronic fatigue and pain

Are You Positioned For Success?

Health professionals are trained to objectively analyse presenting signs and symptoms, in order to offer possible solutions to all manner of ‘conditions’. Today I have been exploring Posture, and the role it generally plays in our daily functional activities, and specifically, in chronic pain presentations.

Why is this interesting?

Because we need to be Positioned For Success!

The way we habitually hold ourselves influences all our movements and ultimately affects how we go about accomplishing our everyday activities – whether we are working, playing sport or a musical instrument, relaxing or sleeping.

I did a bit of research around the topic of being positioned for success by being Cognitively/Mindfully and Behaviourally aware of our posture, and the influences we could pay more attention to.

It has been observed that poor posture is widespread in the general population. It appears to be an adaptive, self- perpetuating trait that most people lack the cognitive ability or desire to correct by themselves. (2)

Studies have shown that people in occupations that include prolonged periods of sitting may experience a high incidence of Low Back Pain. (1)

Commonly adopted relaxed postures are often passive in nature with a predisposition to “sway” standing and slumped sitting which can exacerbate pain. (4)

Increased pain does not leave us positioned for success.

Recent studies conclude that

  • Forward head posture is the most common form of poor posture related to a multitude of myofascial pain disorders and cervical dysfunction. (2) This posture requires the person to flex the lower part of the neck forward and bend the upper portion of the neck backwards.
  • Adopting passive postures such as sway standing and slump sitting can exacerbate pain in individuals with low back pain. Lumbopelvic stabilising musculature is active in maintaining optimally aligned erect postures, and are less active during adoption of passive postures. The muscles of the lumbopelvic region become deactivated and deconditioned, which increases the load on the lumbar discs and ligaments which in turn could leave the lumbopelvic region vulnerable to strain, instability or injury. (4)
  • Back pain intensity and referred leg pain could be significantly reduced after sitting with a lordotic posture, demonstrating that a change in posture could have a positive effect on pain location. Centralisation (a change in distribution of referred symptoms from distal to a more central location) was brought about by certain lumbar movements and positioning. (1)
  • Erect postural alignment in weight bearing positively facilitated the stabilising muscles of the lumbopelvic region. (4) Immediately we are better positioned for success in performing our daily activities.
We are not Positioned For Success when we adopt postures that are not energy efficient and structurally sustainable.

We are not Positioned For Success when we adopt postures that are not energy efficient and structurally sustainable.

Postural Training (being Positioned for Success) works on the assumption that an optimally aligned skeletal system reduces stress in its structures.  It is recommended as one of the Interdisciplinary treatment components of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for chronic pain.

  • It usually involves exercises performed repetitively to stretch structures that poor posture tends to shorten
  • Strengthens structures that poor posture tends to weaken
  • Creates awareness of desirable posture (2)

 

Cognitive Behavioural treatment methods have been applied to the most common chronic pain conditions. Posture correction in daily life, by its very nature, is considered Behavioural Therapy as the individual is required to continually monitor his / her improved conditioned posture for success. (2, 3)

These CBT Programmes usually involve multiple components, including

  • Information to increase knowledge and awareness of the factors influencing the nature and typical course of chronic pain conditions
  • Basics of pain physiology with the emphasis on chronic pain
  • Biomedical and bio-behavioural management of the condition
  • How to self-monitor the signs and symptoms of the condition
  • Cognitive and behavioural therapies aimed at increasing physical and functional activities and adaptive responses to pain
  • Skill training such as the use of relaxation, biofeedback, hypnosis and other self-control strategies to modify the perception of pain and related body sensations
  • Information on the relationship between muscle fatigue, muscle tension and the psycho-physiologic aspect of stress
  • Introduction to cognitive and behavioural pain and stress-coping strategies (3)

 

Instructions for Posture Correction to be positioned for success may include

Sitting

  • Don’t slouch when sitting on a chair
  • Don’t sit with legs crossed
  • Don’t rest chin on hand
  • If sitting on the floor, sit upright by sitting on folded legs
My sitting posture may prevent me from being Positioned For Success

My sitting posture may prevent me from being Positioned For Success

 

My sitting posture may prevent me from being Positioned For Success

 Standing

  • Rest weight on both feet evenly
  • Don’t lean against a wall

 Sleeping

  • Sleep on a firm mattress
  • Sleep on your back
  • Keep your neck straight by supporting on a low pillow or flattened towel

 Eating

  • Bring food to mouth without tilting head forward
  • Chew looking straight ahead, not downward

 Walking

  • Walk with long even strides while swinging your arms

 Others

  • Don’t carry a heavy package with one hand
  • Don’t thrust head forward

Ref (3)

With this information in mind, we could be more mindful to ensure we are better Positioned For Success, without compromising our Postural efficiency.

 

References

1. A comparison of the effects of two sitting postures on back and referred pain     M M Williams, J A Hawley, R A McKenzie, P M van Wijmen Spine Vol 16, No 10,  Oct 1991; 1185-1191

2. Usefulness of posture training for patients with temporomandibular disorders  E F Wright, M A Domenech, J R Fischer Jr  J Am Dent Assoc 2000; 131; 202-210

3. Posture correction as part of behavioural therapy in treatment of myofascial pain with limited opening  O Komiyana, M Kawara, M Arai, T Asano,  K Kobayashi J Oral Rehab May 1999; Vol 26; No 5;428-435

4. The effect of different standing and sitting postures on trunk muscle activity in a pain-free population  P B O’Sullivan, K M Grahamslaw, M Kendell, S C Lapenskie, N E Moller, K V Richards Spine 2002; Vol 27; No 11; 1238-1244

 Which strategies do you employ to ensure you are Positioned For Success?

Please share and repost.

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What MakesYou Feel All Right?

 

 

Do you feel All Right?

It is Okay to Feel the Way you Feel

It is All Right to express ourselves

A pack of coloured IT’S ALL RIGHT postcards landed on my work desk a while ago, and I love the way I feel when I flip through them.

I have them spread out in front of me now, as I write, fanned like a Tarot spread. Each has a phrase that reflects current thoughts and feelings generated by Cantabrians since our world turned topsy turvy in the aftermath of the numerous Christchurch earthquakes.

So much has changed – buildings, landscapes and most of all, people. We all have something to offer, hence the birth of All Right?

What is All Right?

  • It is a social marketing campaign designed to help us think about our mental health and well being
  • It’s about helping people realise that they’re not alone, encouraging them to connect with others, and supporting them to boost their well being
  • It is about ensuring well being is at the heart of our recovery

Who is behind All Right?

All Right? is a Healthy Christchurch project that is being led by the Mental Health Foundation and the Canterbury District Health Board, helped and supported by the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Social Development and SKIP, and the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority.

The ALL RIGHT postcards have a statement on the front, and  some suggestions on the back to help us generate ideas on how we can respond to the feelings we have named. Today, these are the ones that ‘speak to me’, telling me it is ALL RIGHT to feel the way I do!

IT’S ALL RIGHT TO FEEL OVERWHELMED SOME DAYS

Everyone has good days, and then others that are more challenging. At times it can be hard to deal with all the challenges that come our way. When feeling overwhelmed, know that it’s all right, and remember to build on what is going well, and release the things that are holding you back.

Think of something you have always wanted to learn or do, and feel all right to give it a go. Learning new things is a proven way to help us feel good. Commit to doing something active once a week with a friend or family member. Go for a walk, a run or a bike ride and be kind to your body.

What are the things YOU could do to feel All Right, when it all feels a bit much?

 

Wondrous Moments transport us

It is All Right to get caught up in a wondrous moment

Taking time to notice helps us to feel All is Right in our World

It’s All Right to get caught up in a wondrous moment

 

Moment of Wonder

Each moment promises to be a Moment of Wonder

IT’S ALL RIGHT TO FEEL LUCKY

Our hope for our future is vital for the recovery of our city, and for ourselves. How can we instill the feeling that it’s all right to feel positive? How can we become more actively involved in the things that excite us?

By giving something to someone else, no matter how small, we can help to restore their optimism. We could volunteer our time and energy. This also helps us to make a real difference and connect with new people, which is all right too.

What things could you do to give something back, without concern for the rewards?

While we are feeling in a positive place, we could be encouraged to consider who else could also benefit from us feeling All Right. We could check on our friends and neighbours and offer to lend a hand in small ways. Everyone appreciates a little help, and giving to others makes us feel good too.

Practice mindfulness – sit quietly in a busy place and notice the people, sounds and smells that remind us to savour the moment and reflect on All that is Right in our world.

What things can YOU do to share the Good Stuff that you are feeling?

For more information and ideas visit: www.allright.org.nz

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