Holding Out For The Finish Line

holding out for the finish line

Holding out for the finish line

How often have you given up, instead of holding out for the finish line?

This is a question I have been asking myself recently. This could be a theme that runs on a ‘replay loop’ through times of my life.

I am currently working through a business mentoring program with a group of like-minded small business owners. We are just over half way through our programme and I find it hard to quantify all I have learnt or refined in this short while.

What I have learnt:

  • I am not alone in my quest to serve the Greater Good, and in so doing, become the best version of myself that I aspire to be
  • There are others who also struggle with the truth that what each has to offer is incredibly valuable
  • What is required of me is to focus on my vision and then consistently apply small daily actions that will result in rewarding outcomes
  • When I have support and encouragement from those I am working with, and from those whom I serve, the quality of my work improves
  • My best work unfolds when I hold myself accountable to the Highest Version of myself
  • Losing focus, losing faith in myself and the process, prevents me from holding out for the finish line.

When I reflect on the Journey that has brought me to here and now, I recognise many instances where I felt so discouraged with an apparent lack of progress, or a twist in the road that deflected me off the path I was on. Did I lose interest because nothing seemed to be happening – or what I wanted to happen didn’t? Or did I lose sight of the finish line because the journey seemed too long and arduous?

What if those instances were, in fact, just short training periods to prepare me for the big event? Imagine if all those experiences were just the most perfect preparation for what is now working out in my world?

The most wonderful example happened to me yesterday.

I turned up for my monthly 5km timed Parkrun because I had made a commitment to myself that I would hold myself accountable to keep up my morning runs. The Parkrun ensures that I keep on track with time and distance when I run during the week. I felt flat and tired after a busy week – but I was committed! From the first few steps I knew that my legs were running on Angel Power. It was effortless. I was stunned and amazed.

Do you know what feels like to be carried on Angels’ wings, to be fully supported?

I ran my personal best time, which stunned me.

I ask myself now: what will it take to feel this way more often; to consistently tap into the grace of the Universe, to show up and expect to do my best.  This way, holding out for the finish line becomes exciting and enjoyable.

What does holding out for the finish line evoke for you?

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Out Of The Box using Creative Thinking

Creative Thinking moves us out of the box we have become stuck in.

Move Out of the Box using Creative Thinking

Would you like to step Out of the Box you feel confined in?

I meet once a month, via a conference call, with a group of like-minded friends for The Creative Field Project which is:

  • A global network of people committed to the evolution of consciousness.
  • A field of collective awareness of the transforming, healing spirit of Love which is inherent to all people.
  • A context for engaging with other people in our individual awakening, learning and service.

The program is available to anyone, anywhere in the world, regardless of nationality, language, religion or culture. Small groups of about seven people meet monthly to assist with personal and collective breakthroughs that lead to new awareness and a new basis for service in the world. Groups meet in person, via phone or Skype.

At the end of November 2010 I was invited to participate in one such group. I accepted.

It changed my life!

Each month we are sent some material to consider before we meet. Each group has a Facilitator who hosts the meeting, and we are invited to follow a process to reflect on various aspects of the material and our individual responses.

Recently, a new approach was set in motion – we were invited to choose an area or dynamic in our lives where we wanted to effect changes, or shine some light on. We were to be spending four months working on a process which first identified the area/dynamic, then highlighted some creative action points to implement. This process has built in impetus, as once targeted, an action can be fine- tuned while being practiced.

There is great power in being held in a non-judgemental space while naming your fears and so-called failings. Each person in the group is witness to your challenges and shares joyfully in your triumphs. The collective energy grows stronger over time, and my fellow participants have become my chosen family, part of my chosen ‘tribe’.

For the third meeting in this particular cycle we were invited to view the dynamic that we had chosen to work with as if we were living in a closed box, with a limited pattern of thinking and feeling, relative to the circumstances of our life.

In order to transcend feeling stuck or limited, we were invited to think of the two most masterful people we knew (living or not) at a mental and emotional level, who could bring their clarity and focus to the situation to get you Out of the Box. Were there any necessary steps to take to implement these ideas or strategies?

Finally, we were invited to find five different approaches to the things that had been restricted, limited or stuck – approaches out of the box, out of the current mental and emotional context in which we had been functioning. These we would be sharing with our group.

What a valuable and interesting process!

I came away with more ideas than I thought possible, because they were presented from a place outside my usual standpoint, out of my usual box. This coming month will be rich with possibilities, and I so look forward to our next call together, to share in my group’s growth, humour and positive energy.

If you are interested in finding out more about The Creative Field, or would like to join a Small Group, click on the live link.

Expect to function Out of the Box you have been confined in!

 

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Wanting to Live – Wanting to Die

quality of life helps reinforce wanting to live

Wanting to Live

Quality of Life is often taken for granted.

In the past few weeks I have had cause to stop and reflect on what it means to live, and die, well. Three separate recent instances have given me ample opportunity to ponder both wanting to live and wanting to die.

A younger friend triumphed at her third attempt to take her own life. I had not known her for very long, but in the short while that I did, she touched my life deeply and beautifully. We shared exchanges and experiences during a Spiritual Seminar and I remember looking deeply into her eyes and seeing her pure and beautiful essence looking back at me. I can’t imagine the inner turmoil that took her to the edges of her endurance, such that she could not see any other way out of her personal anguish – leaving her wanting to die.

How sad for those left behind: her husband, her family, her friends and work colleagues. Do they blame themselves for not being able to save her from herself? I hope not. They need love and support to celebrate and remember her beautiful soul and the love she brought during the time she was here with us. She was living life, yet choosing the peace of death for herself.

While working in a rest home, I had the real pleasure of meeting a middle aged man who was terminally ill. He told me of his recent exploits, his ‘bucket list’. He had admitted himself into the facility for palliative care, not in the city where he had lived for many years, as he did not want to burden his friends and acquaintances when he died. His estranged family lived overseas and he was matter of fact that they would not be visiting him. He told me about his spiritual beliefs, and that he was not afraid to die. He set about wanting to live his last days with the same enthusiasm that had brought him a very full and interesting life.

A colleague and I were the first two people to enter his room after he had ‘left’ his body. He was lying head propped on one hand, looking up to the ceiling with the clearest blue eyes. While my colleague went to report his ‘passing’ I had the opportunity to Bless him, thank him for allowing me to share some part of his Journey, and to wish him well on his continued Journey.

He had lived life at full tilt, and if he had any regrets he was philosophical that what had been was laid to rest. He died alone, yet touched the lives of each person who had a part in his final days. He lived fully in his body that was dying.

The third person is still living, yet wanting to die. He is elderly, had been a very fit and healthy husband and father – then suffered a severe stroke which left his body ‘half useless’. He says if the results of the stroke can’t be cured, he wants to die. He sees no way forwards if he can’t do all the things he used to do and has to rely on his wife and son to help him with the most basic life skills.

He is living death. He wakes every morning, hating the fact that he has woken. He goes to sleep at night wishing he would not wake. His family are at a loss – what to do? Why won’t he help himself?

In the end, quality of life seems to be the common thread. No matter what our circumstances are, when we feel nurtured and fulfilled we believe that life is truly worth living.

Do you agree? Please share and comment – I value your thoughts about wanting to live and wanting to die.

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The Heart in Two Forms – Treating the Real Heart

Quote

The Real HeartHow much do we really connect with the people in our worlds?

As a physiotherapist I have been taught to observe, palpate, analyse, correct. In some instances, manual therapy has been obliterated totally and the therapist is required to only observe, record and comment.

There is little satisfaction gained when, intrinsically, you ache to get to the root of an issue and manually massage it out or provide a gentle reassuring technique to feed your patient’s need for ‘something to make me feel better’.

John Mandrola wrote an article posted in Medscape recently, about treating the Real Heart. Although I am not a Cardiologist, I related so much to what was being expressed. He was discussing a plenary session presented by Dr Abraham Verghese (Stanford University, CA) during the American College of Cardiology 2015 Scientific Sessions.

Dr Verghese spoke of the heart in two forms:

 

The hearts that we examine physically that are easy to see and

The Spiritual Heart, the organ that connects us as people.

 

He wanted to know what makes that connection, how do we treat the Real Heart of our patient?

Firstly, we need to harness the power of words, as words are the glue that makes the meeting between us happen.

Then, another way to carry the hearts of our patients requires that we notice the ritual that happens during the encounter between the clinician and patient. The place beyond words is the encounter between clinician and patient – the actual ritual. “They trust us with their secrets, they allow us to touch them”.

Dr Verghese went on to say that when we recognise our own sense of self and of the patient’s being, something profound and magical happens.

But, if we shorten this ritual, when we don’t hear or touch our patient, we miss the transformation.

If we connect with the Real Heart of our patient we approach the magic of poetry – a place where the mind and the heart say the same thing.

Have you recently experienced this magic?

It can happen during any encounter during our day, not just between clinician and patient. When did you last greet someone warmly and sincerely, and hug them? Smile a greeting and hold out a hand? Listen to a child’s lament and wipe their tears? You have experienced this magic!

We have the opportunity to truly connect with each others Real Hearts multiple times in our daily interactions, if we could just remember it.

If you resonated with this post, please feel free to share and re-post.

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What MakesYou Feel All Right?

 

 

Do you feel All Right?

It is Okay to Feel the Way you Feel

It is All Right to express ourselves

A pack of coloured IT’S ALL RIGHT postcards landed on my work desk a while ago, and I love the way I feel when I flip through them.

I have them spread out in front of me now, as I write, fanned like a Tarot spread. Each has a phrase that reflects current thoughts and feelings generated by Cantabrians since our world turned topsy turvy in the aftermath of the numerous Christchurch earthquakes.

So much has changed – buildings, landscapes and most of all, people. We all have something to offer, hence the birth of All Right?

What is All Right?

  • It is a social marketing campaign designed to help us think about our mental health and well being
  • It’s about helping people realise that they’re not alone, encouraging them to connect with others, and supporting them to boost their well being
  • It is about ensuring well being is at the heart of our recovery

Who is behind All Right?

All Right? is a Healthy Christchurch project that is being led by the Mental Health Foundation and the Canterbury District Health Board, helped and supported by the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Social Development and SKIP, and the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority.

The ALL RIGHT postcards have a statement on the front, and  some suggestions on the back to help us generate ideas on how we can respond to the feelings we have named. Today, these are the ones that ‘speak to me’, telling me it is ALL RIGHT to feel the way I do!

IT’S ALL RIGHT TO FEEL OVERWHELMED SOME DAYS

Everyone has good days, and then others that are more challenging. At times it can be hard to deal with all the challenges that come our way. When feeling overwhelmed, know that it’s all right, and remember to build on what is going well, and release the things that are holding you back.

Think of something you have always wanted to learn or do, and feel all right to give it a go. Learning new things is a proven way to help us feel good. Commit to doing something active once a week with a friend or family member. Go for a walk, a run or a bike ride and be kind to your body.

What are the things YOU could do to feel All Right, when it all feels a bit much?

 

Wondrous Moments transport us

It is All Right to get caught up in a wondrous moment

Taking time to notice helps us to feel All is Right in our World

It’s All Right to get caught up in a wondrous moment

 

Moment of Wonder

Each moment promises to be a Moment of Wonder

IT’S ALL RIGHT TO FEEL LUCKY

Our hope for our future is vital for the recovery of our city, and for ourselves. How can we instill the feeling that it’s all right to feel positive? How can we become more actively involved in the things that excite us?

By giving something to someone else, no matter how small, we can help to restore their optimism. We could volunteer our time and energy. This also helps us to make a real difference and connect with new people, which is all right too.

What things could you do to give something back, without concern for the rewards?

While we are feeling in a positive place, we could be encouraged to consider who else could also benefit from us feeling All Right. We could check on our friends and neighbours and offer to lend a hand in small ways. Everyone appreciates a little help, and giving to others makes us feel good too.

Practice mindfulness – sit quietly in a busy place and notice the people, sounds and smells that remind us to savour the moment and reflect on All that is Right in our world.

What things can YOU do to share the Good Stuff that you are feeling?

For more information and ideas visit: www.allright.org.nz

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