Jogging Enhances Life Expectancy

It is claimed that people who are physically active have at least a 30% lower risk of death during follow-up – compared with those who are inactive. However, the ideal dose of exercise for enhancing life expectancy remains uncertain.

As a Health Worker and casual jogger, I am always on the lookout for current articles and interesting tips that could add to my knowledge base and enhance the experience of people I come into contact with.

 

A recent article I came across in an online Medical Journal was intriguing!

The Copenhagen City Heart Study was initiated in 1976 by P. Schnor, G. Jensen and     A. T. Hansen to increase knowledge about the prevention of Cardiac Heart Disease and stroke and therefore to enhance life expectancy. Over the years questions were added about heart failure, pulmonary diseases, arthrosis, allergy, epilepsy, dementia, stress, sleep apnea, ‘vital exhaustion’ and genetics.

As part of the Copenhagen City Heart Study, a study was undertaken to investigate the association between jogging and long-term, all-cause mortality by focusing specifically on the effects of pace, quantity and frequency of jogging.

To do this, 1,098 healthy joggers and 3,950 healthy non-joggers have been prospectively followed up since 2001 to review the connection between the Dose of Jogging and Long-term Mortality

Compared with sedentary non-joggers, 1 to 2.4 hours of jogging per week was associated with the lowest mortality. The optimal frequency of jogging was 2 to 3 times per week. The optimal pace was slow or average.

The lowest Hazard Rate (HR) for mortality (or highest Life Expectancy Enhancer) was found in light joggers, followed by moderate joggers, and then strenuous joggers.

 The conclusion findings suggest a U-shaped association between all-cause mortality and dose of jogging as calibrated by pace, quantity and frequency of jogging. The U-shaped association suggests the existence of an upper limit for exercise dosing that is optimal for health benefits.

The Dose of Jogging and Long-term Mortality study concludes that

The dose of running that was most favorable for enhancing life expectancy was jogging

  • 1-2.4 hours per week

  • No more than 3 days per week

  • At a slow or average pace

Many adults perceive this goal to be practical, achievable and sustainable.

 Accumulating evidence suggests that activity patterns that are ideal for promoting long-term Cardio Vascular health and enhancing life expectancy may differ from high intensity, high volume endurance training regimes used for developing peak cardiac performance and maximum Cardio Respiratory fitness.

I feel greatly reassured that my jogging routine falls within these recommended guidelines, and it is indeed most pleasurable and sustainable.

How does your chosen exercise routine enhance your life expectancy?

 

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The Heart in Two Forms – Treating the Real Heart

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The Real HeartHow much do we really connect with the people in our worlds?

As a physiotherapist I have been taught to observe, palpate, analyse, correct. In some instances, manual therapy has been obliterated totally and the therapist is required to only observe, record and comment.

There is little satisfaction gained when, intrinsically, you ache to get to the root of an issue and manually massage it out or provide a gentle reassuring technique to feed your patient’s need for ‘something to make me feel better’.

John Mandrola wrote an article posted in Medscape recently, about treating the Real Heart. Although I am not a Cardiologist, I related so much to what was being expressed. He was discussing a plenary session presented by Dr Abraham Verghese (Stanford University, CA) during the American College of Cardiology 2015 Scientific Sessions.

Dr Verghese spoke of the heart in two forms:

 

The hearts that we examine physically that are easy to see and

The Spiritual Heart, the organ that connects us as people.

 

He wanted to know what makes that connection, how do we treat the Real Heart of our patient?

Firstly, we need to harness the power of words, as words are the glue that makes the meeting between us happen.

Then, another way to carry the hearts of our patients requires that we notice the ritual that happens during the encounter between the clinician and patient. The place beyond words is the encounter between clinician and patient – the actual ritual. “They trust us with their secrets, they allow us to touch them”.

Dr Verghese went on to say that when we recognise our own sense of self and of the patient’s being, something profound and magical happens.

But, if we shorten this ritual, when we don’t hear or touch our patient, we miss the transformation.

If we connect with the Real Heart of our patient we approach the magic of poetry – a place where the mind and the heart say the same thing.

Have you recently experienced this magic?

It can happen during any encounter during our day, not just between clinician and patient. When did you last greet someone warmly and sincerely, and hug them? Smile a greeting and hold out a hand? Listen to a child’s lament and wipe their tears? You have experienced this magic!

We have the opportunity to truly connect with each others Real Hearts multiple times in our daily interactions, if we could just remember it.

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